1. Chuck Palahniuk’s writing a sequel to Fight Club.

Fight Club 2 takes place alternately in the future and the past. It picks up a decade after the ending of his original book, where the protagonist is married to equally problematic Marla Singer and has a 9-year-old son named Junior, though the narrator is failing his son in the same way his dad failed him.
At the same time, Palahniuk says readers will have an idea of Tyler’s true origins. “Tyler is something that maybe has been around for centuries and is not just this aberration that’s popped into his mind.”

    Chuck Palahniuk’s writing a sequel to Fight Club.

    Fight Club 2 takes place alternately in the future and the past. It picks up a decade after the ending of his original book, where the protagonist is married to equally problematic Marla Singer and has a 9-year-old son named Junior, though the narrator is failing his son in the same way his dad failed him.

    At the same time, Palahniuk says readers will have an idea of Tyler’s true origins. “Tyler is something that maybe has been around for centuries and is not just this aberration that’s popped into his mind.”

  2. Benedict Cumberbatch is Alan Turing in The Imitation Game

    The Imitation Game is a nail-biting race against time following Alan Turing (pioneer of modern-day computing and credited with cracking the German Enigma code) and his brilliant team at Britain’s top-secret code-breaking centre, Bletchley Park, during the darkest days of World War II. Turing, whose contributions and genius significantly shortened the war, saving thousands of lives, was the eventual victim of an unenlightened British establishment, but his work and legacy live on.

    My introduction to Alan Turing and Bletchley Park was Neal Stephenson’s brilliant Cryptonomicon. Looking forward to this.

    Also, how cool is it that the guy playing Sherlock is also playing Alan Turing?

  3. This is a wake-up call. #7, man.
via Ultra ScrubQuotes IV

    This is a wake-up call. #7, man.

    via Ultra ScrubQuotes IV

  4. In the wake of all the bad things currently happening in the world, now would be a good time to have a refresher course on randomness.

  5. Hot on the heels of female Thor: black Captain America and a “Superior” Iron Man

    Hot on the heels of female Thor: black Captain America and a “Superior” Iron Man

  6. Metrico is a platformer where the game world is composed of infographics: visualisations of data collected in the game. So for example, a platform you need to raise may be a bar chart for the number of jumps you’ve taken in the game. Other metrics could be time, x and y positions, etc.

    Clever mechanics, and should lead to interesting level design.

  7. Welcome! →

    comicssurvivalkit:

    This tumblr was an idea I have had for a while. Welcome!

    Like all comics pros, I am asked all the time for advice on how to become a pro, and how to maintain that position once you have attained it.

    It is a huge question, even if we knew the answers, it would be a lot to process!

    So over the past few years, I have been collecting bits of practical, useful information in tiny, bite-sized chunks. These have been little mini-lessons that might be very helpful to aspiring creators. Writers, mostly, at first, but we have lots of helpful notes for artists as well that will be going up soon.

    Gail Simone’s new Tumblog, Comics Survival Kit, is a guide for aspiring comic book writers and artists.

  8. I first heard about the Tropes vs. Women in Video Games series months (years?) ago when it was just a Kickstarter project surrounded by controversy. Its creator, Anita Sarkeesian, suffered from online misogynistic abuse for merely trying to get the idea off the ground. I was outraged, I sympathised, and then I moved on. The controversy overshadowed the project and I never got around to watch the series itself. Until yesterday.

    It blew my mind.

    The way Anita defined, explained, dissected and illustrated the various ways women are portrayed in video games is informative, entertaining, well-researched, well-produced, and ultimately, eye-opening.

    I tend to ignore and dismiss feminist dialectic because they seem to me idealistic and unnecessary because I am a man. I was shocked at how much marginalisation women suffer in games, and even more astounded at how I’ve been blind to this all along.

    Start with the above video, but watch the whole series. Required watching for the human race.

  9. George R.R. Martin: “Fuck you”

    George R.R. Martin: “Fuck you

  10. Videogames for Cats? Videogames for Cats →

    Turns out creating videogames for cats is a lot more complex than expected. Great article. It’s basically user experience design for non-humans.

    Although seemingly simple, a great deal of considerations must be taken into account in order to make an app that will appeal to a cat’s senses. In nature, cats are predatory animals that prefer to stalk their prey, studying their movements and preparing to strike the moment the opportunity first presents itself. They’re hard-wired to recognize the patterns of their prey, so it’s imperative that the in-game creatures move in a way the cat can instantly recognize.

    “What I found through testing was that the way the mouse (or any other digital prey) moved was as important as the way it looked,” Martine explains, adding that she watched multiple videos of mice, spiders, and fish in order to “try and mimic their movement.”

    To further complicate it, you also have to cater to an important stakeholder—the human who owns the cat.

    Since cats are obviously not able to use credit cards or browse through the App Store, it’s also important that apps are delivered with a high amount of quality in order to tempt owners into purchasing them for their pet. “The design of the game has to appeal to humans to ‘persuade’ them to purchase it, and it has to appeal to the cat to be a success,” says Martine. “One without the other is not enough.”